Frequency Chart

Click image to view larger version of the frequency chart

120Hz and lower: these frequencies are generally responsible for warmth in a recording. Too much and the recording will sound muddy.

120Hz – 600Hz: these frequencies give depth to a recording, giving vocals and other instruments a strong sense of presence without being clinical. On the other hand, these frequencies are where you’re most likely to experience problems with vocal resonance. Too much in this area can be particularly fatiguing.

600Hz – 3kHz: these frequencies also give presence but of a generally harder nature. High output in this region is fairly common in rock music as it gives it a hard edge that suites the genre.

3kHz- 7kHz: is the area where vocal sibilance resides. 3kHz-5kHz is a very common peaking area in rock music because human hearing is pretty sensitive here and extra output here makes it sound louder. It also adds a harshness that is particularly fatiguing so don’t over do it. Because of the high sensitivity in this region you can add warmth without loss of clarity by attenuating this region a bit.

7kHz -: Cymbals etc, and all the other components that add the sense of quality and accuracy. Above 10kHz too much output may make your recordings sound like they are lacking some definition.

If your tracks lack warmth and have too much sibilance you either have too little output below 500Hz or too much above 3kHz. A generally good balance will be pretty flat from around 60Hz up to 1-2kHz and then rolling off to be around 10-20 dB down at 10kHz. How much tapering at the spectrum ends you’ll need will depend on the nature of the music.

If there are some sharp peaks in the peak spectrum (yellow trace) that stand out above the rest then they may need to be attenuated a bit. Again, don’t try to eliminate the peak but just reduce and control it a bit. A good rule of thumb would be to reduce the peak so that it is about as high as the other undulations on the spectrum.

Finally, strong output in the region of 3-5kHz can make recordings sound fatiguing and clinical. If you have strong output in this region reduce it by approximately 3dB.

BUY NOW!

Har-Bal version 3.7 can be purchased and downloaded immediately through RegNet by following this link.

Upgrade from version 2.3 for US$41.95, Upgrade from version 3.0 for US$12.00

(Registered Users will be contacted by email with upgrade instructions)
Haven't been contacted about the upgrade? [Click Here]

Har-Bal 3 Manual

For those who are eager to learn more about Har-Bal version 3 the manual can be viewed on line here.
A PDF version can also be downloaded for viewing offline here

Har-Bal News

What the Pro’s Say

Clarke’s third law says “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”. That is what you have done!
Chuck McDowell
Chuck McDowell
All I can say is wow!!! Witness the restoration of an old song “Shake that Body Music” I recorded/released in the mid 1980’s. This demonstration of the Har-bal 3.0 software proves this software is nothing short of amazing! When the song was uploaded to Earle, it had no dynamics, no power, or presence. I had absolutely no idea how much Har-bal 3.0 enhances audio until I listened to how it breathed life back into this song! I am extremely impressed and elated that my song was chosen to demonstrate the Har-bal 3.0 software! There is simply nothing on the market that compares. Thanks Earle and Har-bal 3.0!!!
Donald Harris
Rythmn Machine
Donald Harris
“(Har-Bal is) a cleverly implemented tool that fixes EQ problems with astonishing speed and precision…(it’s) is a welcome, important, well-designed program for those who believe mastering has much more to do with subtle response touch-ups than squashed dynamics. Very cool” Craig AndertonEQ Magazine Jan 2004
“Har-Bal is a truly unique program, extremely affordable and probably the quickest and easiest way to balance your audio material.” Ian Waugh, Music Tech MagazineMarch 2004
“Sounds good enough to use on commercial tracks. I found Har-bal an altogether more serious application than any other EQ ripping utility I’ve reviewed to date.” Martin Walker, Sound on Sound MagazineMarch 2004
“Overall, version 2.0 is a huge step forward, since it not only provides the means to improve the sound of your mixes, but also has a very good stab at doing this automatically. I can see IntuitQ being controversial in some mastering circles, but in my opinion the results speak for themselves.” Martin Walker, Sound on Sound MagazineMarch 2006
Overall, although it’s still initially harder to get to grips with than some rival ‘EQ ripper’ utilities, I still prefer Harbal, with its more considered approach to improving the final sound of an audio track, the detail of its manual and tutorials, and its helpful on-line user forum hosted by Har-Bal’s professional mastering and research engineers. It’s a serious tool that can teach you a lot about why your mixes don’t sound like commercial tracks, at the same time as improving them. Martin Walker, Sound On Sound MagazineJuly 2004
I don’t have to take my product to a high-end studio anymore – I have Har-Bal! Tameko StarMusic Dish
Australian developer Paavo Jumppanen has certainly delivered the goods on this one and turned a sceptic into a believer with this awesome piece of software. Har-Bal really does give eyes to your ears. Todd MacalpineOzmusicweed

Mastering Tutorial

The following is a mastering tutorial explaining many tips, tricks and audio mastering secrets. There are a number of methods used to accomplish harmonic balancing or spectral correction. Your tracks will sound their best when they are first processed in Har-Bal before any digital eq or multiband

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